Things fall apart

Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2006 - Sander Buyck

Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2006 – Sander Buyck

Although he travels the world to take pictures, in his images there is no sign of stereotypical portrayal. There is poetry, personality, and just the hint of a story. He’s an excellent observer.

Jenin, OPT, 2011 - Sander Buyck

Jenin, OPT, 2011 – Sander Buyck

Sander Buyck was born in Ghent (b 1984), Belgium were he studied photography. I was recently introduced to his work because he won the 2-yearly provincial price for visual arts (Oost-Vlaanderen-Belgium). The resulting exhibition showcasing his work was such a nice discovery. All pictures shown here are from the accompanying catalogue.

Havana, Cuba, 2009 - Sander Buyck

Havana, Cuba, 2009 – Sander Buyck

Tel-Aviv, Israel, 2010 - Sander Buyck

Tel-Aviv, Israel, 2010 – Sander Buyck

Paris, France, 2008 - Sander Buyck

Paris, France, 2008 – Sander Buyck

“Rendez-vous au paradis” is a series on Palestinian martyrs photographed the way he encountered them on posters in the streets of Palestina. The project tells their individual stories as recounted by family members in a video that can be watched on iPads in the exhibition and now also on the project website.

Martyr #2 / Rendez-vous au paradis, West Bank, OPT, 2011 - Sander Buyck

Martyr #2 / Rendez-vous au paradis, West Bank, OPT, 2011 – Sander Buyck

“Things fall apart” is the title of an artist book he produced in 2009. For me it sums up beautifully the atmosphere in his images.

 

Between Dreams and Reality

Blood Brothers, 2013, Kustaa Saksi

Blood Brothers, 2013, Kustaa Saksi

I learned a new word. Hypnopompic is the dreamlike state between sleeping and waking that can evoke hallucinations. It is also the name of a series of wall hangings developed by Finnish graphic designer and artist Kustaa Saksi (b1975).

Arbor Vitae, 2013, Kustaa Saksi

Arbor Vitae, 2013, Kustaa Saksi

Without a background in textiles, Kustaa Saksi was able to produce these wonderful tapestries in the TextielLab in Tilburg, the Netherlands. The TextielLab is a unique knowledge and production centre for producing experimental knits and woven fabrics.

Hiding in Plain Sight, 2013, Kustaa Saksi

Hiding in Plain Sight, 2013, Kustaa Saksi

The resulting 8 wall hangings reveal a wonderful world of surreal landscapes with animals, plants and patterns. They are absolutely stunning, incredibly detailed and can be admired in the Textiel Museum, Tilburg, NL till Nov 2nd 2014.

Arachne's Web, 2013, Kustaa Saksi

Arachne’s Web, 2013, Kustaa Saksi

The development process of these works is illustrated in the exhibition by a fascinating film which offers a glimpse into the workplace showing Kustaa working closely together with a product developer of the TextielLab.

To actually see the tapestries in the exhibition space (and feel the samples) was a breathtaking experience, only then they reveal their three-dimensional qualities and amazing details and textures.
An artist to be watched!

detail 'Bood Brothers' Kustaa Saksi (2013)

detail wall hanging ‘Bood Brothers’ by Kustaa Saksi (2013)

Art by the Yard

 

Detail fashion textile with design by Pablo Picasso (1960's)

Detail fashion textile with design by Pablo Picasso (1960’s)

After the Second World War, the attitudes to art changed. The idea that art was the privilege of the wealthy began to fade. Many artists looked for ways to make their work less elitist and more appealing to a broader audience. They discovered design as a means to achieve this. Like graphic design and book illustrations, printing their designs on fabric was a logical step.

Joan Miró, roller-printed cotton fashion textile, 1955

Joan Miró, roller-printed cotton fashion textile, 1955

Salvador Dalí, fashion textile, 1950's

Salvador Dalí, fashion textile, 1950’s

In the post-war era, an enthusiasm for modernity and new ways of living permeated the American society, and nothing showed a commitment to modernity more clearly than an association with modern art.

Pablo Picasso with his second wife Jacqueline Roque. She wears a dress made from Picasso's textile 'Notes' for Fuller Fabrics, ca.1955.

Pablo Picasso with his second wife Jacqueline Roque. She wears a dress made from Picasso’s textile ‘Notes’ for Fuller Fabrics, ca.1955.

Saul Steinberg - 'Paddington Station' - roller printed cotton textile, 1952

Saul Steinberg – ‘Paddington Station’ – roller printed cotton textile, 1952

In the mid-1950s, an ambitious collaboration between the New York-based Fuller Fabrics company and several artists produced a line of prints by Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Fernand Léger, Marc Chagall and Raoul Dufy. Consumers were given access to a Joan Miró dress or a Salvador Dalí tie.
Even Pop artist Andy Warhol turned his hand to textiles.

Marc Chagall - "Belle Fleurs", screen printed cotton and rayon textile, 1956

Marc Chagall – “Belle Fleurs”, screen printed cotton and rayon textile, 1956

dress made with 'Melons'-screen printed border cotton textile designed by Andy Warhol, 1956.

Dress made with ‘Melons’-screen printed cotton textile designed by Andy Warhol, 1956.

In 1956, the sculptor Eduardo Paolozzi and the photographer Nigel Henderson started the art collective Hammer Prints in Essex, UK. Together with their wives, Freda Paolozzi and anthropologist Judith Stephen, they collected images from advertisements, cartoons, ethnographic and other scientific sources and translated these into patterns which they screen printed on fabric, tiles, wall paper etc. They produced some of the most innovative and influential designs of that time in Britain.

Eduardo Paolozzi and Nigel Henderson - 'Barkcloth', screen-printed cotton twill furnishing textile, 1955.

Eduardo Paolozzi and Nigel Henderson – ‘Barkcloth’, screen-printed by the artists themselves on cotton twill furnishing textile, 1955.

The distinction between fine and applied art started to blur in the 50’s and that’s beautifully illustrated in this exposition “Artist Textiles-Piccaso to Warhol” at the Textile Museum in Tilburg (The Netherlands) till 14 Sep 2014. All the pictures shown were taken in the exposition.