Art by the Yard

 

Detail fashion textile with design by Pablo Picasso (1960's)

Detail fashion textile with design by Pablo Picasso (1960’s)

After the Second World War, the attitudes to art changed. The idea that art was the privilege of the wealthy began to fade. Many artists looked for ways to make their work less elitist and more appealing to a broader audience. They discovered design as a means to achieve this. Like graphic design and book illustrations, printing their designs on fabric was a logical step.

Joan Miró, roller-printed cotton fashion textile, 1955

Joan Miró, roller-printed cotton fashion textile, 1955

Salvador Dalí, fashion textile, 1950's

Salvador Dalí, fashion textile, 1950’s

In the post-war era, an enthusiasm for modernity and new ways of living permeated the American society, and nothing showed a commitment to modernity more clearly than an association with modern art.

Pablo Picasso with his second wife Jacqueline Roque. She wears a dress made from Picasso's textile 'Notes' for Fuller Fabrics, ca.1955.

Pablo Picasso with his second wife Jacqueline Roque. She wears a dress made from Picasso’s textile ‘Notes’ for Fuller Fabrics, ca.1955.

Saul Steinberg - 'Paddington Station' - roller printed cotton textile, 1952

Saul Steinberg – ‘Paddington Station’ – roller printed cotton textile, 1952

In the mid-1950s, an ambitious collaboration between the New York-based Fuller Fabrics company and several artists produced a line of prints by Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Fernand Léger, Marc Chagall and Raoul Dufy. Consumers were given access to a Joan Miró dress or a Salvador Dalí tie.
Even Pop artist Andy Warhol turned his hand to textiles.

Marc Chagall - "Belle Fleurs", screen printed cotton and rayon textile, 1956

Marc Chagall – “Belle Fleurs”, screen printed cotton and rayon textile, 1956

dress made with 'Melons'-screen printed border cotton textile designed by Andy Warhol, 1956.

Dress made with ‘Melons’-screen printed cotton textile designed by Andy Warhol, 1956.

In 1956, the sculptor Eduardo Paolozzi and the photographer Nigel Henderson started the art collective Hammer Prints in Essex, UK. Together with their wives, Freda Paolozzi and anthropologist Judith Stephen, they collected images from advertisements, cartoons, ethnographic and other scientific sources and translated these into patterns which they screen printed on fabric, tiles, wall paper etc. They produced some of the most innovative and influential designs of that time in Britain.

Eduardo Paolozzi and Nigel Henderson - 'Barkcloth', screen-printed cotton twill furnishing textile, 1955.

Eduardo Paolozzi and Nigel Henderson – ‘Barkcloth’, screen-printed by the artists themselves on cotton twill furnishing textile, 1955.

The distinction between fine and applied art started to blur in the 50’s and that’s beautifully illustrated in this exposition “Artist Textiles-Piccaso to Warhol” at the Textile Museum in Tilburg (The Netherlands) till 14 Sep 2014. All the pictures shown were taken in the exposition.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s