Rothko’s soup

No. 16 by Mark Rothko, 1957. Oil paint on canvas, 252 x 207 cm.

No. 16 by Mark Rothko, 1957. Oil paint on canvas, 252 x 207 cm.

Mark Rothko (1903-1970) is considered as one of the most important artists of the 20th century. His large abstract paintings with colour blocks, so typical for Rothko’s classical style, are auctioned for tens of millions of dollars.

Mark Rothko, New York, 1960. Photo by Rudy Burckhardt.

Mark Rothko, New York, 1960. Photo by Rudy Burckhardt.

More than 20 years (until his suicide in 1970), Rothko painted rectangular blocks in the most vivid of colours but even so in black. How did this extreme reduction of imagery came to be? How did he become an abstract painter?

Antigone by Mark Rothko, circa 1941. Oil paint and charcoal on canvas, 86 x 116 cm.

Antigone by Mark Rothko, circa 1941. Oil paint and charcoal on canvas, 86 x 116 cm.

What i enjoyed tremendously in the current exhibition ‘Mark Rothko’ in Den Haag (The Netherlands) is the attempt to answer these questions. A lot of attention is dedicated to the early figurative work and the evolution to his later work.

Personage 2 by Mark Rothko, 1946. Oil paint on canvas, 142 x 82 cm.

Personage 2 by Mark Rothko, 1946. Oil paint on canvas, 142 x 82 cm.

His move from a naturalistic to a surrealistic style in the early 40’s is influenced by his interest in myths, psychoanalysis and the writings of Nietzsche. This stylistic move coincided also with major changes in his private life: after living as a Russian in the States for 25 years he was naturalised and he changed his name from Rothkowitz to Rothko. He divorced his first wife Edith Sachar, struggled with a depression and stopped painting for some time to work on his essay ‘The Artist’s Reality’.

No. 18 by Mark Rothko, 1946. Oil paint on canvas, 155 x 110 cm.

No. 18 by Mark Rothko, 1946. Oil paint on canvas, 155 x 110 cm.

His adaptation of surrealism to his first abstract style, the so-called multiforms, occurred around the mid 40’s. His friendship with Clyfford Still seems to have played an important role in this evolution.

Untitled by Mark Rothko, 1948. Oil paint on canvas, 126 x 112 cm.

Untitled by Mark Rothko, 1948. Oil paint on canvas, 126 x 112 cm.

The multiforms shown in the exhibition in Den Haag are absolutely gorgeous and completely mesmerising. A soup of slowly moving forms with blurred lines between figure and background. Abstraction is boiling.

No. 9 by Mark Rothko, 1948. Oil paint and mixed media on canvas, 134 x 118 cm.

No. 9 by Mark Rothko, 1948. Oil paint and mixed media on canvas, 134 x 118 cm.

No. 10 by Mark Rothko, 1948. Oil paint on canvas, 164 x 108 cm.

No. 10 by Mark Rothko, 1948. Oil paint on canvas, 164 x 108 cm.

In 1950 Rothko starts to develop his signature style with rectangular, hazy colour fields on monochrome portrait formats. Rothko is no longer stirring the soup.

No. 7 (or) No. 11 by Mark Rothko, 1949. Oil paint on canvas, 173 x 111 cm.

No. 7 (or) No. 11 by Mark Rothko, 1949. Oil paint on canvas, 173 x 111 cm.

All pictures are scans from the catalogue ‘Mark Rothko’ accompanying the exhibition in the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag from 20 Sep 2014 till 1 Mar 2015.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s