Next of Kin

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Biljana Kroll – from the poster series “Next of Kin”

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has an online collection of fine art. But what is rather genius about them is that they support creatives of all fields by allowing and encouraging the public to download the high-res images of their various collections and create new art with it.
And that’s what Biljana Kroll does. She thankfully uses the richness of these digital scans as a starting point for her designs.

I was immediately charmed by her latest poster series “Next of kin“. In that series she  creates floral collages combining florals from 16th century floral still-life paintings with the abstract finger paintings of her toddler son. How cool is that? I’m always in for mother-child art co-operations!

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Biljana Kroll’s fingerpainting sessions with her toddler son

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Biljana Kroll – from the poster series “Next of Kin”

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Biljana Kroll – from the poster series “Next of Kin”

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Biljana Kroll – from the poster series “Next of Kin”

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Biljana Kroll – from the poster series “Next of Kin”

 

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Biljana Kroll – from the poster series “Next of Kin”

See more of Biljana Kroll’s portfolio on her website.

 

Work/Travail/Arbeid

Work/travail/Arbeid, 2015 from Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker (still)

Work/Travail/Arbeid, 2015 from Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker (still)

Performing dance as an exhibition in a museum is not a common practice. But i must say, a highly engaging experience for the viewer!
Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, the famous Belgian dancer-choreographer (°1960) was invited by WIELS (Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels) to make an exhibition as a performance and a performance as an exhibition – this resulted in Work/Travail/Arbeid. Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker re-interpreted her stage piece Vortex Temporum set to the music of Gérard Grisey, to fit the museum space and she re-casted the choreography as a 9-week long exhibition.

Work/travail/Arbeid, 2015 from Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker (still)

Work/Travail/Arbeid, 2015 from Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker (still)

Work/travail/Arbeid, 2015 from Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker (still)

Work/Travail/Arbeid, 2015 from Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker (still)

Dancers from De Keersmaeker’s dance company Rosas and musicians from the Ictus ensemble perform live in the museum spaces, over the entire opening hours of the exhibition, for nine weeks. It is a truly exceptional experience to witness the unfolding of this work. I found it totally hypnotising and before I realised I spent hours watching the dancers, the musicians and the visitors. The small kids that were present in the public were absolutely amazing to watch. I saw kids rolling on the ground, running circles, spurting through the whole performance, taking pictures of the dancers… It clearly resonated with them.

Work/travail/Arbeid, 2015 from Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker (still)

Work/Travail/Arbeid, 2015 from Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker (still)

A dancer re-draws a chalk circle of the pattern guiding the dancers

Dancers re-draw a chalk circle of the pattern guiding the dancers

The exhibition will travel to Centre Pompidou, Paris (26.02 – 06.03.2016) and Tate Modern, London (July 2016), where it will be presented in a 9-day version.

Watch more works by Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker: – Violin Phase on music by Steve Reich – Rosas Danst Rosas on music by Thierry De Mey and Peter Vermeersch – Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker talking about Fase performed in Tate Modern. Pictures in this post are taken by me.

Close up close

Lucas, 1986-87 by Chuck Close

Lucas, 1986-87 by Chuck Close

If you can’t make it to the MET the MET can come to you.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York presents more than 500 collection highlights in the online gallery One Met. Many Worlds. And that in no less than 11 languages…
That’s coming very close to an art playground!

Detail Lucas, 1986-87 by Chuck Close

Detail Lucas, 1986-87 by Chuck Close

In the objects gallery you can not only select a work of art and read details about the work and the art historical context, details can also be clicked on to highlight and uncover an additional layer of meaning.

Detail Lucas, 1986-87 by Chuck Close

Detail Lucas, 1986-87 by Chuck Close

Taken from the ‘art history’ tab of this work by Chuck Close: Close’s gigantic portrait of the artist Lucas Samaras is based on a Polaroid photograph divided into grid segments for enlargement. In the late 1960s, Close began creating monumental, finely executed Photorealist portraits in acrylic. … Viewed close-up, Samaras’s face dissolves into thousands of small squares, each with its own distinct, colorful pattern; from a distance, this remarkable proliferation of abstract forms coalesces into an image of profound impact, capturing the sitter’s hypnotic intensity.

As a visitor to One Met. Many Worlds. you are invited to contribute by pairing details from the collection in a creative way. You can see my pair in the Visitor Gallery.
Go and have fun in the MET!

 

Moving Textiles

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What I particularly liked in the ‘Moving Textiles’ exhibition in Ronse (Belgium) is the exploration of how artists challenged each other by cross-border collaboration.

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Each work of art went through several interventions, carried out by 3 to 4 artists from Belgium and/or UK. Everything in the process took place anonymously. The participants did not know who would carry out an intervention before or after them. Everything was carefully registered by means of codes.

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In the works you recognize specific textile techniques such as knitting, weaving, lace, sewing, cutting, cut-offs, felt, tufting, digital printing, embroidering, etc… Interesting!
Oh, and there’s some lovely clothes inspiration for grabs too.
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If you want to find out more, please check the website of Moving Textiles -Crysalis and the Metamorphosis blog.